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Friday August 31, 2012

A number of Cadets from Robert Land Academy returned to school one week early this year to take part in the Academy’s Student NCO (Non-Commissioned Officer) Leadership Training Course. 

Robert Land Academy is Canada’s only private military-style school for boys.  Entering its 34th year in operation, the Academy enrols students from across Canada and around the world.  Offering a structured boarding school program that understands the needs of boys, the Academy provides extensive academic remediation and support, a physically active program which promotes a healthy lifestyle and personal growth, and a distraction-free environment located in a rural setting – all of which create an environment in which boys can be successful and take pride in their many achievements.

In the spring these Cadets submitted an application requesting to participate in the course which is designed to develop skills, shape their confidence, and position them for potential student leadership opportunities at the Academy in the coming school year.

Throughout the week, Cadets attended clinics and participated in hands-on learning exercises on principles and elements of leadership, time management and organization, mentoring, and calling parade drill.  They also received instruction and training on basic canoe safety in preparation for team building exercises during a canoe trip to the Grand River in Haldimand County.

The week culminated with a Graduation Parade and the selection of the Top Candidate of the course.  Many of the Cadets departed for the Labour Day weekend, and return following their break to welcome both new and returning students throughout the first week of September.

For further information about Robert Land Academy visit: www.robertlandacademy.com or contact:

Robert Land Academy
6727 South Chippawa Rd.
Wellandport, Ontario L0R 2J0   Canada
Tel: 905-386-6203
www.rla.ca

 

Thursday August 16, 2012

A FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONAre tuition payments to Robert Land Academy tax deductible?

If your son is under the age of 16 and/or is diagnosed with a disability (ADD, ADHD, ODD, Learning Disabled, or some other disability), you may qualify for tax relief for tuition payments paid to Robert Land Academy under Canada’s:

  • Medical Expense Tax Credit
  • Disability Tax Credit
  • Child Care Expense Deduction, or
  • Through the creation of a Health & Welfare Trust (for business owners)

For further information on this topic, watch our four-part pre-recorded information webinar hosted by financial planner Peter Merrick, President of Merick Wealth.

Webinar Video: Part 1 of 4 (11:02)
In part 1 of this webinar, Peter Merrick provides valuable insight aroung affording tuition at a private school and what the “real cost” is in terms of before-tax earnings.  He provides important background information about Canadian tax law and explains the Child Care Expense Deduction (CCED).

WATCH PART 1

Webinar Video: Part 2 of 4 (14:15)
In part 2, the topics of Medical Expense Tax Credits (METC) and Health and Welfare Trusts (HWT) are discussed

WATCH PART 2

Webinar Video: Part 3 of 4 (12:56)
In part 3 the topics of the Disability Tax Credits (<?xml:namespace prefix = st1 /?>DTC), Registered Disability Savings Plans (RDSP), Ontario Disability Special Payments (ODSP), and Registered Education Savings Plans (RESP) are discussed.

WATCH PART 3

Webinar Video: Part 4 of 4 (12:49)
In part 4 of this webinar, Peter Merrick provides a summary of the entire webinar and answers questions submitted by webinar participants.

WATCH PART 4

 

FURTHER INFORMATION:  For further information on this topic, including links to relevant Canada Revenue Agency interpretation bulletins, click the followig link:  INFORMATION

CONATCT ROBERT LAND ACADEMY: For further information about Robert Land Academy, to attend one of our parent information sessions, or to schedule an enrolment interview, call 905-386-6203 or Contact RLA

Thursday August 2, 2012

By Sandy Naiman

(NC)—For most kids, the prospect of “going back to school” triggers excitement, nervousness and angst, but for a small subset of adolescent boys, traditional schools don't work. Some have ADHD, ADD or ODD. Others struggle with diabetes or morbid obesity. Still, others flirt with substance abuse or the law.

Each boy's issues are unique, but solutions are never easy, according to Tina Ward who sent her son Maxwell to the Robert Land Academy (RLA) two years ago. “He has Type 1 Diabetes and wasn't controlling himself properly.”

“No parent ever feels happy about sending their child away, especially when he doesn't really feel he deserves it,” she adds.

Along with Max's consistently high blood sugar, “my marks were poor and I couldn't talk to my family,” he says. Everything began changing when he arrived at RLA, Canada's only military-style school near Welland, Ontario.

“In a matter of days, I started feeling healthier and better about myself. By showing me what's important, by giving me balanced meals every day, by the exercise we had to do, the Academy helped me a lot,” Max says.

RLA students “typify a particular temperament,” says founder and headmaster G. Scott Bowman (Maj. ret.), describing them as dominant, stubborn, intuitively bright, often lazy, with powerful and extreme personalities.

“They're gregarious, effusive and adventurous in spirit,” he says. Often at odds with conventional authority, they don't like change unless they author it. Yet, “as adolescents, they're typically manipulative and can be overtly oppositional or passive aggressive.”

Genuinely empathetic with his recruits, Bowman started his school in 1978 because he has the same temperament, but no such school existed for him, he explains. RLA was established for future generations of struggling, misunderstood boys, like himself, Max Ward and hundreds of others.

“Intellectual curiosity is a constant in these boys,” Bowman adds. “It causes teachers and parents grief.”

Ward's mother credits RLA's regimentation for the “marked change in her son's health.” He eats meals at exact times, counts carbs and engages in physical activities, “all great for diabetics,” she says. “He's more athletic, more sports-minded. His marks have improved, too.”

Now his odds of managing his health and diabetes are better than ever because he is physically fit and eats well.

“Max is accountable for himself. What else can you do as a parent? You can't be there 24 hours a day.”

Posted with permision from:
News Canada

www.newscanada.com
Thursday August 2, 2012

By Sandy Naiman

(NC)—Today morbid childhood obesity is an increasingly critical societal, cultural, medical and emotional health issue jeopardizing every sphere of a young person's life from his interpersonal relationships to his academic abilities.

Robert Land Academy (RLA) cadet Peter Smith (who requested a pseudonym) used to be a poster boy for morbid obesity.

Not any more.

After one year of rugged physical fitness, regimented eating, structured military-style living, and his schoolmates' and teachers' support, Smith has dropped 105 lbs. Last summer he weighed 360 lbs. Now, at 15 and a much healthier 252 lbs., he's added years to his life, and he's on roll.

“This summer I hope to lose more weight to get down to my 210 pound goal,” he says.

Smith didn't lose his weight at RLA by dieting.

At home, he'd raid the fridge whenever he wanted. “I used to think I ate pretty healthy. When I got sad, though, I'd eat a lot. Emotions controlled my eating,” he says. “Now, I eat three times a day. I like the food here. It tastes good. They don't give you too much or too little. You control your portioning. Make choices.”

RLA Chef Bruce Ness, an alumnus and classically trained professional chef is “a believer in home-style cooking, food that sticks to your ribs, feeds the mind, body and soul, that carries you for the day.”

Before attending RLA, Smith admits he couldn't handle school. “I had poor study habits. I couldn't do my homework, couldn't even read. Now, I sit down, read, study for exams and do all my courses properly.

“RLA taught me how to set goals, value my nutrition, work out properly.”

Last year, he couldn't run one lap “without getting out of breath. I couldn't do anything. Nobody liked me. Now, I can run five kilometres in 32.3 minutes and do 40 push-ups.”

Smith had set backs. After foot surgery, he was immobilized for two weeks until RLA Deputy Headmaster Colin Doig helped him back onto his feet. They started running together.

“It was hard, but he stayed at my pace, pushing and teaching me how to run properly. I thank Major Doig for everything I've accomplished this year. Without him I wouldn't have gotten anywhere.”

Posted with permision from:
News Canada

www.newscanada.com

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